Monday, November 20, 2017

A Finish! Gwennie Inspired Medallion


Gwennie Inspired Medallion
60 x 69
Hand Quilted

Basking in the glow of the morning sunrise. 


I don't normally make medallion quilts for the same reason I don't normally border quilts - I can never think of what to add for a border. 

In May 2016 Lori of Humble Quilts came up with the idea of a Gwen Marston inspired medallion quilt along. Each person would do their own thing make a center medallion and add rounds each month based on a prompt.  Ok...I joined in thinking that if I had prompts I might be able to make a medallion. 

The center prompt was BASKET.   Good.  I won a bunch of baskets from Block Lotto so I was ready and off to a good start. 

 And then the second prompt was CHILDHOOD.  Yikes!!  
I finally came up with weaving for my childhood prompted round and used some brown fabric that looked like a basket and wove some red, yellow and blue fabrics through it.   I really never liked dolls when I was little but preferred books and crafts.  One of the crafts I have liked through the years has been weaving starting with those potholder looms with loops that make a worthless potholder. I still have one of those looms.  I also still have a small loom that I used to weave belts and a rug (in strips).  I have looms that "knit" stocking caps.  And I've woven several baskets. 

The next prompt was LOG CABIN.  So I made little 3 inch quarter log cabins and used the traditional red fabric for the center - red fabric with baskets on it. 

Next prompt was STAR.  So I made little 3 inch friendship stars  from my 1.5 inch scraps and "wove" them in with red/white rail fence blocks.   I used any color of scraps for the star backgrounds since there were baskets in many colors in the center. 

And then came FISH for a prompt. Fish? Seriously?   I finally ended up with blue and white HST waves and some of the blue fabrics even had fish in them. How's that for using the old gray cells? 

And then I hand quilted it every which way, this way and that way.  (Have you ever seen a lassie go this way and that way?) 

And then I used a red basket weave looking fabric for the back. 

You may or may not know that I have a wringer washer and not some newfangled washer so wash everything pretty much by hand (by choice).   Since I had used a red backing I put the quilt in the washtub with three new color catchers and two old color catchers that hadn't caught any color.  I really haven't ever had much of a problem with bleeding but there's always a first time so I'm always a little cautious and go heavy on color catchers.  Then what to my wandering eyes should appear but red, red, red, red water. RED. REALLY RED.  And the color catchers were RED. REALLY RED.  I pulled that quilt out as fast as could be and threw it into the other wash tub and grabbed the Dawn and followed Vicki Welsh's directions to save a bleeding quilt. 


Then I hung it out on the line in the freezing cold because it had too much water in it to go in the dryer right away.  Quilts don't easily go through the wringer so I just squeeze out as much water as I can.  I would have put it on the drying rack in the basement but it had some sweaters drying on it.   Anyway...I found out how freeze drying works!  After a day on the clothesline in the freezing temps that quilt was stiff as a board.  I let it thaw a little and then put it in the dryer. 

And there you have it.  I made a medallion quilt! 




27 comments:

Jeanne said...

Another beauty! Whew, close call with the red!!

---"Love" said...

Quite a quilt, and also quite a story! Question: are the pictures from before you washed the quilt, or after washing? If after, the washing method really worked well! ---"Love"

Nann said...

Did I count correctly that this is your 28th quilt finish for the year? Bravo! A couple of months ago I overheard a conversation about new washing machines -- apparently the latest water-saving models have sensors to determine the weight of the load and thus dispense water accordingly. That can result in less water than desired (for whatever the load may require). I commented that I think I'll take care of my 15-y-o washer!

Karen - Quilts...etc. said...

Glad you got the red out!! When I grew up in Wisconsin my mom had a wringer washer and no dryer - it was freeze dry clothes outside and racks inside in the winter - yes to above comment on the water level not always being what you want in the water savers - you never get a full washing machine of water - it was horrible for washing quilts I was so glad when mine started to have problems so I could get rid of it and replaced with one that wasn't a water saver - you can still choose load size but get the water that you need for quilts.

Quilting Babcia said...

My mom had a wringer washer when I was young but ever since moving out on my own (over 50 years ago) I've used automatic washers, laundromat variety for many years! We used to pound small nails into the ends of old wooden spools and "knit" yarn tube to stitch up into hats or dollhouse rugs. Lots of memories brought up in this post, as well as the eye candy of this fabulous scrappy Gwennie inspired quilt!

mangozz said...

I love baskets and your quilt is adorable! I always pre-wash fabrics except for pre-cuts for exactly that reason, as well as preshrinking them, especially reds and dark blues and blacks. In fact, I've bought some precuts lately and am really worried about using them in quilts. After all that work, you hate to have it ruined by something you might have prevented. Just thought I'd mention that I found your post through Em's Scrapbag in the morning. I don't usually get your e-mails until late evening. Curious isn't it?

Julierose said...

Lovely how those baskets came together--hugs, Julierose

Linda said...

Goodness me, you were lucky to get all that red out of the quilt. So pleased you did, it's a lovely quilt! Love Gwennie Quilts and this one does her designs proud. I never played with dolls either, lived teddies and soft toys. Dad made me a weaving frame from an old picture frame (small!) and nails hammered in round the edges. Loved my corking Spool too that he made from a large wooden cotton reel. Those were the days!

Cynthia Brunz Designs said...

It is great seeing this one again. I love basket quilts. And all your borders are fantastic. Another great finish!

Nicole said...

Holy hannah, what a good save! With a more modern washer you wouldn't necessarily have seen the bleeding until too late. And nice quilt too ;)

Ellen said...

Your quilt is wonderful! I remember my Mom bringing in clothes from the line in winter and they were stiff as boards. She would whack at them with a broom before she took them off the line if they had snow on them. Funny memories - thank you!

audrey said...

What a great finish! I do so enjoy reading through your decision making. Those gray cells are definitely working just fine! Great save on the red bleeding issues. Just had some more of that myself. Just drives me insane having to worry about that, but not enough to go soak all my red fabrics for 12 hours each which is probably what I have to do in order to make 100% sure it never happens!

Janie said...

You think on your feet! Great save and good story about the red incident.
That is a great quilt and thanks for sharing your process, priceless!

gayle said...

Quilts with their own stories are the best quilts, and your frosty baskets certain have a great story!
If I get stuck with a water saver washing machine, I think I'll have to chuck a brick or two in with each load. Farm laundry needs a goodly amount of water to wash away some of the umm... stuff we get into...

cityquilter grace said...

beautiful quilt....nice job

Nancy said...

This is such a fun, happy quilt. I'm impressed that you hand quilted it and that you're finished with it already. Way to go!

Nancy said...

I'm back. I forgot that I wanted to disagree with you about those potholders we used to make as kids (which we used to make in pairs and sell for a quarter). To me they are the best hot pads ever -- but only if they're made of cotton loops. Mine have worn for years and years, some 30 years, and when I need more I make them. I love those old cotton hot pads. Just my opinion, of course, but I wonder what makes you think of them as worthless.

Cathy said...

It’s great to see this epic quilt finished. And what a great story to go along with it! But doing laundry anywhere but in my laundry room is one convenience I won’t ever voluntarily give up. Unless someone hangs me a nice clothesline in the summer!

Louise said...

I'm glad you were able to stop the red dye bleed in time, or you might have been a basketcase! I really like how you wove both the current clue and previous clues in each round. Grey cells, indeed :)

em's scrapbag said...

I love how you wove this all together. I have many happy memories with looms also. Your quilt is wonderful.

Quiltdivajulie said...

I remember the freak out I felt with the CHILDHOOD and FISH prompts. EEK! Your quilt turned out wonderfully - freeze drying included. You sure are on a finishing roll lately ... good for you!

Kaja said...

Good save - I have those Vicki Welsh instructions bookmarked! I enjoyed watching people doing these medallions so it's lovely to see yours finished.

Kathryn T said...

What a fun challenge and an amazing quilt at the end, freeze drying how interesting! Congrats on the finish.

Daffycat said...

Oh, it’s so pretty! I’d love to hand quilt some day. I’ve thought a lot about your washer since I broke my arm! One of the (few) things I can do one-handed is toss laundry in the washer & dryer. But I still like the idea of an old fashioned washer!

Patty said...

Beautiful quilt and quite the story \. Glad it all worked out. Thanks for linking up with Elm Street Quilts One Monthly Goal and congrats on your finish.

squeekee999 said...

Great finish! I really need to try block lotto

desertskyquilts said...

And a beautiful one it is! I like the lotto baskets. I was wishing I'd win that month. I miss it.

I think I was about 7 when my mother finally got a Maytag automatic washer. As a young married, I had a wringer in the basement, and I was so glad to get it! I'm somewhat spoiled now with a washer AND a dryer in the basement. I always thought wringer washers were quite efficient, if a little labor intensive. But then, try using a washboard or rocks! LOL